An innovative approach such as we are showing in LIFE Resilias understandably raises questions; we like to hear them!

We recognise that everyone will have questions about the LIFE Resilias project or the ecosystem resilience approach, in particular from their own perspective. On this page you will find an overview of the most frequently asked questions and the corresponding answers. This page will be continuously updated during the project. If your question is not listed, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Questions about the ecosystem resilience approach

No. That is not the intention of LIFE Resilias, because we know that this is often not feasible. The alien species that we target with the ecosystem approach are now so widespread and common that complete elimination is not realistic. We therefore choose to make them manageable with targeted management, aimed at increasing resilience. In this way, the ecosystem itself can keep the alien species under control.

No, for each combination of ecosystem and species, the possibility of strengthening the resilience of the ecosystem must be examined. The most important factors are the species characteristics, the current composition of the ecosystem and its desired composition.

Yes, it is more difficult for new invasive alien species to establish in a resilient ecosystem. This will not apply to all invasive alien species in all ecosystems. The chances of success are higher for new invasive alien species with corresponding characteristics to the invasive alien species for which the ecosystem resilience approach works. For example, in LIFE Resilias we are studying whether the ecosystem resilience approach of black cherry (Prunus serotina) in forests is also applicable to other invasive trees in forests such as the tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima).

There are indeed many alien species in our country. We make a distinction between alien species and invasive alien species. In LIFE Resilias we focus on the invasive species because they threaten the native ecosystem.

LIFE Resilias is a project and runs for seven years. The focus is to show the possibilities of the ecosystem resilience approach. We do this by working together with managers, owners, policymakers, and other stakeholders. They can experience for themselves which measures can be used for which invasive alien species and how the approach works in specific areas.

General questions about the project

Yes, you absolutely can. One of the ambitions of the project is that the philosophy of the ecosystem resilience approach finds its way to as many people as possible who are dealing with an invasive alien species and would like to tackle it in a natural and effective way. Within the project, we call this replication. So, if you own an area in which you would also like to apply the ecosystem resilience approach, please do not hesitate to contact us to discuss the possibilities.

Black cherry (Prunus Serotina): Bart Nyssen, Bosgroep Zuid Nederland
Japanese knotweed (Fallopia Japonica): Janneke van der Loop, Stichting Bargerveen
Australian swamp stonecrop (Crassula helmsii) : Laura van Veenhuisen, Stichting Bargerveen
Pumkinseed sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus): Hein van Kleef, Stichting Bargerveen

The project will run for a total of seven years; from November 2020 to October 2027

An innovative approach such as we are showing in LIFE Resilias understandably raises questions; we like to hear them!

We recognise that everyone will have questions about the LIFE Resilias project or the ecosystem resilience approach, in particular from their own perspective. On this page you will find an overview of the most frequently asked questions and the corresponding answers. This page will be continuously updated during the project. If your question is not listed, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Questions about the ecosystem resilience approach

No. That is not the intention of LIFE Resilias, because we know that this is often not feasible. The alien species that we target with the ecosystem approach are now so widespread and common that complete elimination is not realistic. We therefore choose to make them manageable with targeted management, aimed at increasing resilience. In this way, the ecosystem itself can keep the alien species under control.

No, for each combination of ecosystem and species, the possibility of strengthening the resilience of the ecosystem must be examined. The most important factors are the species characteristics, the current composition of the ecosystem and its desired composition.

Yes, it is more difficult for new invasive alien species to establish in a resilient ecosystem. This will not apply to all invasive alien species in all ecosystems. The chances of success are higher for new invasive alien species with corresponding characteristics to the invasive alien species for which the ecosystem resilience approach works. For example, in LIFE Resilias we are studying whether the ecosystem resilience approach of black cherry (Prunus serotina) in forests is also applicable to other invasive trees in forests such as the tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima).

There are indeed many alien species in our country. We make a distinction between alien species and invasive alien species. In LIFE Resilias we focus on the invasive species because they threaten the native ecosystem.

LIFE Resilias is a project and runs for seven years. The focus is to show the possibilities of the ecosystem resilience approach. We do this by working together with managers, owners, policymakers, and other stakeholders. They can experience for themselves which measures can be used for which invasive alien species and how the approach works in specific areas.

General questions about the project

Yes, you absolutely can. One of the ambitions of the project is that the philosophy of the ecosystem resilience approach finds its way to as many people as possible who are dealing with an invasive alien species and would like to tackle it in a natural and effective way. Within the project, we call this replication. So, if you own an area in which you would also like to apply the ecosystem resilience approach, please do not hesitate to contact us to discuss the possibilities.

Black cherry (Prunus Serotina): Bart Nyssen, Bosgroep Zuid Nederland
Japanese knotweed (Fallopia Japonica): Janneke van der Loop, Stichting Bargerveen
Australian swamp stonecrop (Crassula helmsii) : Laura van Veenhuisen, Stichting Bargerveen
Pumkinseed sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus): Hein van Kleef, Stichting Bargerveen

The project will run for a total of seven years; from November 2020 to October 2027

Latest news